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Author Topic: Man City's bizarre way of doing business  (Read 2112 times)

Offline the dude abides

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Man City's bizarre way of doing business
« on: July 09, 2011, 05:40:36 PM »
Bayern blast price for Boateng Bayern Munich's chief executive Karl-Heinz Rummenigge has taken a swipe at Manchester City's hefty asking price for Jerome Boateng.

The 22-year-old has not been able to settle in at his new club since a reported £10.5million move from German giants Hamburger SV in 2010.

However, the German international may find it difficult to complete his dream move back to the Bundesliga because Roberto Mancini seems to be taking a stubborn stance on his £17million valuation.

That transfer hike has angered Rummenigge in particular who believed City were using "tactics" to get clubs to stump up extra cash unfairly to capture the versatile defender's services.

"They are using a tactic I've never seen. They don't respond, even if we try to contact them," he told The Sun.

"I think they are going to have 48 players under contract but, according to Financial Fair Play, they can have only 25.

"According to their last balance sheet, if I'm correct, they're down £127million.

"Maybe they still have a trick up their sleeves but I'm not sure they will be permitted to play in the Champions League."
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Offline Tes

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Re: Man City's bizarre way of doing business
« Reply #1 on: July 09, 2011, 10:36:15 PM »
Trick # 1  Get your mate to sponsor your rented stadium for a ridiculous sum of money.
Don't make the same mistake twice, there's plenty of new ones to choose from.

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Offline Tes

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Re: Man City's bizarre way of doing business
« Reply #2 on: July 10, 2011, 12:57:37 AM »
Top clubs want Manchester City's £400m sponsorship deal vetoed

By Rob Draper    9th July 2011



Europe's leading clubs will petition UEFA to block Manchester City's new £400million endorsement deal.
They want City's ground and shirt sponsorship contract with Etihad Airlines outlawed because they believe it has been artificially inflated in an attempt to balance the books.

UEFA's new Financial Fair Play rules insist clubs live within their means and City, who have incurred losses of £213.5m over the last two years, had little hope of complying before the huge deal.
The governing body also demand that clubs demonstrate they have received market value for any deal, to prevent owners from subsidising clubs through companies that are closely associated with them. UEFA's Independent Club Financial Control Panel will investigate the Etihad deal but rivals want to pressure them into action. If UEFA do outlaw the deal, boss Roberto Mancini could see his spending plans curtailed.

Opposition clubs have been emboldened by the fact the contract is a world record, outstripping even the remarkable £18m-a-year stadium naming rights deal the New Yorks Mets, a much-more established sports brand, have with Citibank.
The fact that Etihad was set up by the Emir of Abu Dhabi, Sheik Khalifa, who is the brother of City's owner, Sheik Mansour, has also fuelled their suspicions.
Etihad is the national airline carrier of Abu Dhabi and itself has never made a profit since it was formed in 2003, though it is expected to make money this year.



http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/football/article-2013014/Top-clubs-want-Manchester-Citys-400m-deal-vetoed.html

So a company that has never made a profit, is going to through £400M at Mansour City. A company that just happens to be owned, in reality, by the brother of City's owner.

If this doesn't fail every test under UEFA's so called Financial Fair Play then the whole thing is dead before it's even started. I wonder which Russian company will soon be sponsoring Sibneft Bridge or the Football Association Old Trafford.
Don't make the same mistake twice, there's plenty of new ones to choose from.

Those who choose to preach would do well to take note of their own sermons.

Offline Juan

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Re: Man City's bizarre way of doing business
« Reply #3 on: July 10, 2011, 02:09:07 AM »
Top clubs want Manchester City's £400m sponsorship deal vetoed

By Rob Draper    9th July 2011



Europe's leading clubs will petition UEFA to block Manchester City's new £400million endorsement deal.
They want City's ground and shirt sponsorship contract with Etihad Airlines outlawed because they believe it has been artificially inflated in an attempt to balance the books.

UEFA's new Financial Fair Play rules insist clubs live within their means and City, who have incurred losses of £213.5m over the last two years, had little hope of complying before the huge deal.
The governing body also demand that clubs demonstrate they have received market value for any deal, to prevent owners from subsidising clubs through companies that are closely associated with them. UEFA's Independent Club Financial Control Panel will investigate the Etihad deal but rivals want to pressure them into action. If UEFA do outlaw the deal, boss Roberto Mancini could see his spending plans curtailed.

Opposition clubs have been emboldened by the fact the contract is a world record, outstripping even the remarkable £18m-a-year stadium naming rights deal the New Yorks Mets, a much-more established sports brand, have with Citibank.
The fact that Etihad was set up by the Emir of Abu Dhabi, Sheik Khalifa, who is the brother of City's owner, Sheik Mansour, has also fuelled their suspicions.
Etihad is the national airline carrier of Abu Dhabi and itself has never made a profit since it was formed in 2003, though it is expected to make money this year.



http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/football/article-2013014/Top-clubs-want-Manchester-Citys-400m-deal-vetoed.html

So a company that has never made a profit, is going to through £400M at Mansour City. A company that just happens to be owned, in reality, by the brother of City's owner.

If this doesn't fail every test under UEFA's so called Financial Fair Play then the whole thing is dead before it's even started. I wonder which Russian company will soon be sponsoring Sibneft Bridge or the Football Association Old Trafford.

Henry said it a couple of months back that if the financial fair play rule couldnt be regulated properly from the start then why bother.

I dont know enough about Ethiad to pass judgement but it does raise eyebrows. 400 million sponsorship for 10 seasons. So thats 40 million a season for Maine Road to be known as Ethiad. Realistically after this the ffp rules are probably dead in the water because there will be so much creative accounting City will be able to spend whatever they want every summer. What will stop Sheik Mansour buying X million man city jerseys thus increasing revenues. Im not convinced Citys spenidng can be curtailed.

Offline Tes

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Re: Man City's bizarre way of doing business
« Reply #4 on: July 10, 2011, 10:58:42 AM »
There's a whole lot of football related development planned around Eastlands in addition to a new training complex, part of which will be for public use. It's being suggested that the deal is for Etihad to have their name on all of the development, hence making the total deal of a more believeable 'market value'.

But how does a company, that has never made a profit, find £400M to sponsor the rented stadium of a team that has no real profile outside of Manchester, nevermind Europe wide or globally?
If this is the 'market value' as far as the FFP goes, then we should have no problem attracting a billion pound naming rights deal if we move or £750M if we stay at the genuinely world famous Anfield. Of course this won't happen because neither John Henry or Tom Werner happens to have a brother that will make it happen.

 
Don't make the same mistake twice, there's plenty of new ones to choose from.

Those who choose to preach would do well to take note of their own sermons.

Offline the dude abides

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Re: Man City's bizarre way of doing business
« Reply #5 on: July 10, 2011, 09:59:47 PM »
the whole thing is crazy, Tes.

And it makes me wonder if a financial fair play rule (as much as we crave it), will be workable.

These big business owners are very creative.  They will find ways around everything.  Platini's gang are mere kids in this big bad business environment.

It is depressing and frustrating. 


In the midst of winter, I finally learned that there was, in me, an invincible summer.

There’s no next time. It’s now or never.